1911: ‘Pit’ Bulldog Muzzle Ordinance, Ogden, UT

Bulldogs Are Dangerous
The Evening Standard
August 4, 1911
Library of Congress

Bulldogs Are Dangerous
A vicious bulldog is a dangerous animal. Here is an account of a bulldog making an attack on a horse, taken from a San Francisco paper:
–snip–
The Ogden city administration acted wisely when it passed an ordinance requiring bulldogs to be muzzled. The animals are instinctively a fighting machine and the most vicious of dogs and will set upon man or beast in their mad fury until weakened or killed by clubbing. Running at large, without muzzles, they are more dangerous than hungry wolves on a prairie. – The Evening Standard

Bulldogs As a Menace
The Ogden Standard
January 29, 1914
City Edition
Library of Congress

Bulldogs As a Menace
The ordinance prohibiting owners of bulldogs allowing their animals to go about unmuzzled should be enforced. Complaints are made that pet dogs are being killed by these blood-thirsty dogs. This is not the worst feature. A bulldog will attack anyone and the most ferocious have been known to kill children. No bulldog, however much a pet at home, should be free to go without a muzzle. The city laws authorize any one in authority to shoot down a bulldog not held in leash or muzzled, and that is good law as the dogs are too dangerous when not rendered harmless by the prescribed restraints. – The Ogden Standard

The bulldog of the late 1800s and early 1900s is the same dog as today’s pit bull terrier. The only thing that has changed about this dog breed in the last century are the different names it goes by: bulldog, pit dog, bull pit, bull terrier — pit bull terrier. Modern dogfighters still call their fighting pit bulls “100% bulldog.” (See: Disguise breed name)
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